Marine mammals

The Sussex Coastline is home to an abundance of marine wildlife including six species of marine mammals! The team at Brighton Dolphin Project gives us top tips on the mammals we should keep an eye out for.

Brighton dolphins

In Sussex, we are lucky enough to have not one not two, but three species of Dolphin that are regularly spotted in our waters!Bottlenose Dolphins that are here year round and regular visitors in the form of Common Dolphins and White-beaked Dolphins.

The world’s smallest marine mammal

Our coastline is also home to one of the smallest marine mammals, the Harbour Porpoise. We also have two seal species; the grey seal and the Harbour (or Common) Seal. Click on each species to find out more.

Bottlenose dolphin

Bottlenose dolphin
Bottlenose dolphins inhabit warm and temperate seas worldwide, being found everywhere except for the Arctic and Antarctic Circle regions. Their ...
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Common dolphin

Common dolphin
The Common Dolphin is the most abundant cetacean in the world, with a global population of about six million. Adults ...
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White-beaked dolphin

White-beaked dolphin
The White-Beaked Dolphin is a robust species of dolphin with a short beak. Adults can reach 2.3 to 3.1 m ...
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Harbour porpoise

Harbour porpoise
The Harbour porpoise is one of seven species of porpoise. As its name implies, it stays close to coastal areas ...
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Harbour seal

Harbour seal
The harbour seal, also known as the common seal, is a true seal found along temperate and Arctic marine coastlines ...
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Grey seal

Grey seal
The grey seal is found on both shores of the North Atlantic Ocean. It is a large seal of the ...
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Dolphin spotting 

Brighton Dolphin Project research and study these Marine mammals. Part of our work is based on recording sightings, where we ask people to report any sightings and tell us about their experience. Here are a few of the most recent and exciting sightings!  Find out how far we come with our project and how you can get involved here.

Written by the team at Brighton Dolphin Project