Coastal birds

The Sussex coastline has some great spots for coastal bird-watching.  From Kingfishers to Kittiwakes, you will find an abundance of beautiful coastal bird life right on your doorstep. Lynn Beun from the RSPB Brighton & District Local Group has chosen her top six.

There’s no such thing as a seagull!

Lynn Beun, Leader, RSPB Brighton & District Local Group

“There’s no such thing as a seagull”. I was taught this when I started birdwatching. What! you say? Yes, there are different types of gulls and they have different names. I will tell you about three gulls and two of my other favourite coastal birds that you can spot in Sussex. This is just my personal selection, which ones would you choose?

No. 1 Herring Gull

No. 1 Herring Gull
In the Number One spot it has to be – the Herring Gull! I always think they have a mean ...
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No. 2 Kittiwake

No. 2 Kittiwake
If Herring gulls have a mean glint in their eye, I think that the little kittiwake looks sweet and gentle ...
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No. 3 Cormorant

No. 3 Cormorant
Want to see a prehistoric looking bird? I think you should look no further than the cormorant! Cormorants have an ...
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No. 4 Black Headed Gull

No. 4 Black Headed Gull
Black headed gulls are handsome birds with – not black heads in fact but a dark brown hood. Take a ...
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No. 5 Oystercatcher

No. 5 Oystercatcher
Another colourful bird with a bright red beak and red legs is the Oystercatcher. You may see little groups of ...
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No. 6 Turnstone

No. 6 Turnstone
Close to Brighton Marina or in Shoreham you may see the little aptly named Turnstone, running along the water’s edge ...
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Seen any exciting coastal bird sightings in Sussex? Have you got any tips on bird-spotting you would like to share? Let us know in the comments box below.

Hotspots for Coastal Birds

Use our map below to discover hotspots in our area and some of the key species to look out for.

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Spotlight on…

Below are our latest articles exploring birds in Brighton in further detail. This week Kerrie Curzon has written an article on why the Kittiwake colony at Splash Point is thriving and take a walk along the Brighton coastline with Lynn Beun from the RSPB Brighton & District Local group.

Kittiwakes at Seaford Head in a changing climate

Kittiwakes at Seaford Head in a changing climate

Edward Thomas Booth notes in his catalogue from June, 1867 that kittiwakes (Rissa tridactyla) are common. They are currently the ...
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Spotting birds along Brighton's seashore

Spotting birds along Brighton’s seashore

Written by Lynn Beun, Leader, RSPB Brighton & District Local Group Living in this area we are very lucky, and ...
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